Town Line Tuesday: Meet the Cast

They say nobody exists in a vacuum, that no one ever goes through life without being impacted and shaped by the people around them. This is of course true of fictional characters as well. No matter how brilliantly crafted a main character, their story is nowhere near as interesting if they don’t have friends and/or family to support them or enemies to challenge them. In the spirit of this, I thought I’d introduce you to a couple of the central characters in Daphne’s story so far.

Hannah Beckman

Species: Human

Age: 28

Gender: Female

Hair: Red

Eyes: Green

Occupation: AEGIS agent

Hannah is Daphne’s best friend and partner. She grew up in AEGIS–the secret vigilante organization that works to keep peace between humans and Supernaturals–her entire family having been agents of the organization for almost as long as AEGIS has existed. Hannah is a highly trained badass whose skill in hand-to-hand combat and marksmanship, not to mention her mile-wide stubborn streak, are more than a match for Daphne’s own. Even though Daphne is the one with the people-reading powers, Hannah’s even-tempered nature and easy charm usually makes her a better diplomat than often hot-headed Daphne. Especially when Daphne tells her exactly which buttons to push. Despite her lifestyle of living with a gun in her hand and blood under her nails, her hands are always perfectly manicured–even if she can’t quite lose the calluses on her palms–and she’s mourned the loss of more than one fabulous dress in the line of duty.

 

Spencer Montgomery

Species: Human

Age: 27

Gender: Male

Hair: Light Brown

Eyes: Gray/Green

Occupation: New Salem Sheriff’s Department Deputy

Spencer is Daphne’s adoptive brother. While they share neither blood nor legal familial ties, Daphne and Spencer grew up together and Spencer’s father was more of a dad to Daphne than Daphne’s flesh-and-blood one. The Spencer Daphne knew was an intelligent yet carefree man with a penchant for breaking rules in the name of having fun. In the wake of his father’s sudden death, Spencer is a new man. A more serious, more suspicious, more reckless man, and yet still every bit as prone to breaking a few rules in the name of finding his father’s killer. He still blames Daphne for leaving New Salem without so much as a goodbye and now, ten years later, she’s returned from who-knows-where and he can’t help but wonder what her true motives are for coming home.

Margaret Beckman

Species: Human

Age: 50

Gender: Female

Hair: Graying Dark Blonde

Eyes: Brown

Occupation: Lore and Logistics Admin for AEGIS

Once a field agent for AEGIS, Marge has long since hung up her sword (figuratively at least) and taken up a desk job at the organization, coordinating field missions, filing reports and researching and updating supernatural lore for the archives. It’s supposed to be a promotion but, truth be told, she sometimes misses getting her hands dirty. As Hannah’s mother, she has naturally had more of a presence in Daphne’s life as an AEGIS agent than she has with most field agents and Marge and Daphne have developed a strong mentor-student bond as a result. No one understands Daphne’s mindset at the beginning of the novel better than Margaret Beckman, even if she is worried what that grief might make her young friend do.

 

Anka Satoya

Species: Human

Age: 42

Gender: Female

Hair: Black

Eyes: Brown

Occupation: Coroner for the New Salem Sheriff’s Department

Anka is the Coroner for the NSSD and a close friend of Spencer’s. She’s confident, smart, and the best at her job–something she’s not too humble to admit. She adores Spencer so even though it could cost her her job and every instinct she has is screaming there’s something suspicious about this Daphne character who has shown up at Spencer’s side seemingly out of nowhere, she’ll do anything she can to help her friend get justice for his father’s murder.

 

The Demon

Species: Demon

Gender: Female

Hair: ??????

Eyes: Endless Voids of Evil

Occupation: None

The Demon is New Salem’s one-and-only urban legend. In a town where the supernatural has always been impossible, no one tells stories about haunted houses or bogeymen or even monsters under the bed. The Demon is the only exception because she is less a legend than indisputable fact. The Demon was a real girl once, a citizen of New Salem born and raised. But time and fear have a way of twisting things and she was a strange girl with even stranger eyes; eyes they say could tear your very soul from your body if you looked at them too long. Said to have telepathic and mind-control powers–and those being only the very tip of the iceberg as far as what she can do–The Demon is the antithesis of all that New Salem holds sacred. So when people start dying of mysterious, seemingly supernatural circumstances in New Salem, everyone knows The Demon must be the one behind it.

 

Town Line Tuesday: Writer’s Block

Every writer has been subject to the plague known as Writer’s Block at one point or another and every writer has their own way of dealing with it, methods that are, ultimately, just treatments for the symptoms and not a cure for the disease itself–no matter what you do, Writer’s Block always rears its ugly head again. Writer’s Block can manifest in many forms and can persist for varying degrees of time, sometimes it comes as a loss of inspiration, sometimes as a loss of motivation or the ability to express oneself, it can last a few hours or a week or even years in truly severe cases. My own personal struggle with Writer’s Block is a near constant wrestling match between the story I want to tell and a brain that refuses to cooperate. Rarely is it an issue of ideas but instead a sort of invisible wall in my brain that makes it near impossible to get my ideas from my head to the page. It’s a sort of anxiety I think, a feeling like what I have to say needs to be said perfectly and if it’s not perfect, it might as well not even be on the page. Even now, writing each sentence feels like trying to squeeze that last little bit of ketchup out of the bottle without it exploding everywhere in a bloody red mess. Dad told me today that I need to just relax and just write, stop worrying so much about it being perfect that nothing gets done, which is good advice, advice I’ve heard before from several college writing professors, but saying it and getting my brain to actually comply are two very different things.

So how do you get that annoying invisible wall to go away long enough to actually be productive? Well, you’ve got your basic Google search of options. There’s the obvious putting it down and coming back to it later which is good for stressed out minds but not so good for productivity or lack of inspiration. Exercise such as yoga or anything that gets your blood flowing is always good–when I do have inspiration problems I like to go on nice long walks to clear my head. Some people say you need to minimize distractions but while I’m sure this works for some people, staring at a blank Word doc is the opposite of helpful to me. Listening to music is supposed to help but I always listen to music when I write (I don’t know about you but I can’t work in complete silence, I need background noise) so it’s less of a cure for Writer’s Block and more of a necessity. And then there’s the seemingly paradoxical tactic of free-writing. I mean, if you’re having problems writing it seems like you wouldn’t be able to sit down and, well, write, though I suppose it probably helps with specific problems with inspiration. You can’t figure out how to write the current project you’re working on, go write something else until you’ve loosened up enough to write what you need to write. Personally? When it comes to this particular kind of Writer’s Block, I prefer what I call the ninja method. When I’ve been staring at a blank Word doc, kind of knowing what I need to say but not quite able to say it, I need to shut my brain up so I can just relax and write. And in order to do that I need to sneak up on the problem; like a ninja. So I read. Sometimes a book, sometimes fan fiction, sometimes I just scroll on Tumblr, anything to distract my anxious foggy mind, to lull the anxiety into quieting for a bit, to clear my head and inspire me. Like the “walk away from this for a bit” option there is a very thin line between clearing up the Writer’s Block and your everyday procrastination. But, at least for me, it works better than staring at a blank Word doc getting increasingly anxious and frustrated.

Town Line Tuesday: Context? What Context? #2

Hey everyone, sorry I haven’t been posting regularly as of late, I’ve been a bit busier than usual. I’m dog-and-house-sitting this week for a family friend and I’m just getting settled in today so this week’s Town Line Tuesday will be another short one but I will be posting another non-novel-related post later in the week and should be back to regular Town Line Tuesdays next week. For now, enjoy another out of context line from page 21 line 11.

“I just follow orders dear. And so do you, so I expect you to keep everything you learn here hush-hush.”

Town Line Tuesday: SupernaturalsOnly

In honor of Valentine’s day, I thought it would be fun to create a fake dating profile for Daphne. This ended up being way more involved than I originally imagined and I might go back and edit this at a later date (it’d be awesome if I could somehow get artwork for a profile pic at some point) but for now, enjoy!

Continue reading

Town Line Tuesday: Context? What Context?

I thought it might be fun to post a short random quote from what I’ve written of the novel so far with zero context. I determined this quote using a random number generator to decide what page and paragraph to pick from. I’d like to say I got this on the first try but I had to go through a lot of “he nodded” and “she shrugged” and long rambling possibly spoiler-y paragraphs before I found one that was short and worked well enough out of context. If I decide to do this again later I’ll have to figure out a better system. But for now, from page 28 paragraph/line 4:

 

“Do I get mauled to death by a werewolf or something?” Hannah joked.

Town Line Tuesday: Making Time

When I was younger, I had a superpower. It’s a power that I believe most kids have, though based on how often I got complimented on it–even by people the same age as me–maybe it’s not so common. From grade school up through high school and even a bit into college, I had the ability to create time out of nothing. No matter how hectic my life got or how much stress school poured on I always had time to do the things I loved.

Like most writers I was (and perhaps to a lesser extent still am) a major bookworm, my average reading speed used to be about a book per week, sometimes a little longer for bigger books and sometimes less than a week when I really got into a book (I started and finished Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince a nearly 700 page book in a single day) and whenever people asked me how I found time to read as much as I did between school, homework, and other every day responsibilities I just told them that I made the time to sit down and read. Simple as that. Because to me it was that simple; if you love doing something and you really want to do it you make the time to do it no matter how crazy life gets. And yet, somewhere along the way I seemed to have lost that gift. Life becomes busier when you’re an adult, but even just two years ago I had time enough to keep up with my college courses and homework and still have time to read (although admittedly less than I used to) and keep up with my favorite shows, and just six months or so ago I made time to get out of my house and go for a walk every day in the midst of searching for a job. Now, I almost feel guilty any time I do take the time to do anything relaxing and I almost never go out for a walk anymore except on weekends.

If it were just things like television and video games or even reading that were falling by the wayside, I probably wouldn’t be making this post, but right now, the responsibilities in my life have a hierarchy with job searching being my highest priority, daily chores and/or errands next on the list followed by this blog, and finally my novel way at the bottom where it hardly ever gets the attention I want to devote to it. In the spirit of the old me, I have carved out time every Wednesday afternoon to go to a local coffee shop for some much-needed alone time in order to sit down and do nothing but write the novel. Still, it’s not nearly enough. True, I could spend time on the weekends but sue me, after a week spent cooped up inside staring at a computer screen, all I want to do on the weekend is get out of the house. So now I find myself looking back on the old me, trying to remember the secret to creating time out of thin air. If I figure it out I’ll be sure to let you know.